ALLELOPATHIC IMPACT OF SORGHUM AND SUNFLOWER ON GERMINATION AND SEEDLING GROWTH OF SUMMER BROADLEAF WEEDS

Authors

  • M. N. Kandhro Department of Agronomy, Sindh Agriculture University, Tandojam, Pakistan
  • S. D. Tunio Department of Agronomy, Sindh Agriculture University, Tandojam, Pakistan
  • I. Rajpar Department of Soil Science, Sindh Agriculture University, Tandojam, Pakistan
  • Q. D. Chachar Department of Crop Physiology, Sindh Agriculture University, Tandojam, Pakistan
  • A. W. Gandahi Department of Soil Science, Sindh Agriculture University, Tandojam, Pakistan

Keywords:

allelopathy, germination, growth, sorghum, sunflower, weeds

Abstract

Allelopathy is the releasing of certain compounds by one plant species which may suppress the germination and growth of neighbouring plants of another species. It offers a great potential for weed management. The laboratory bioassays were conducted for two consecutive years to assess the allelopathic potential of sorghum and sunflower during Kharif (summer) 2010 and 2011 under completely randomized design with three replications. The treatments comprised of control (check), sorghum and sunflower root/shoot powder applied @ 10 g kg-1 soil, and sorghum and sunflower root/shoot water extract applied @ 10 ml kg-1 soil. The data illustrated that water extracts and powders of allelopathic crops significantly reduced germination and growth of selected weeds: Waho (carpet weed: Trianthema portulacastrum L.), Lulur (false amaranth: Digera arvensis Forsk.) and Naro (field bindweed: Convolvulus arvensis L.). Sorghum and sunflower shoot water extracts exhibited strong allelopathic efficacy. These treatments conferred lowest and statistically equal (P ? 0.05) values for germination, root length, shoot length, and fresh and dry biomass of tested weeds. The water extracts of sorghum and sunflower shoots and roots caused greater inhibitory effects on weeds as compared to powder treatments. Hence, the results suggest that sorghum and sunflower contain allelopathic effect with growth suppressing potential, and their herbage can be applied through water extract or soil incorporation for effective management of summer broadleaf weeds.

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Published

2015-12-31